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Highly Accessed Letter

Hypernatremia and intracranial pressure: more questions than answers

Donald EG Griesdale123*, Mypinder S Sekhon1 and William R Henderson1

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Medicine, Division of Critical Care Medicine, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, 855 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1M9, Canada

2 Department of Anesthesia, Pharmacology and Therapeutics and Department of Medicine, Division of Critical Care Medicine, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, 855 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1M9, Canada

3 Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Evaluation, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, 828 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1M9, Canada

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Critical Care 2012, 17:401  doi:10.1186/cc11888


See related research by Wells et al., http://ccforum.com/content/16/5/R193

Published: 7 January 2013

Abstract

The observational literature suggests that hypernatremia is associated with worse outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury. In a previous issue of Critical Care, Wells and colleagues add to this literature by failing to show an association between hypernatremia and reduced intracranial pressure. However, we must bear in mind many limitations of observational methods before eliminating hyperosmolar therapy from our armamentarium.