Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from Critical Care and BioMed Central.

This article is part of the supplement: 33rd International Symposium on Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine

Poster presentation

Multidisciplinary approach to improving documentation of visual acuity in patients presenting with ocular trauma

L Low* and M Johnston

  • * Corresponding author: L Low

Author Affiliations

NHS Tayside, Dundee, UK

For all author emails, please log on.

Critical Care 2013, 17(Suppl 2):P265  doi:10.1186/cc12203


The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://ccforum.com/content/17/S2/P265


Published:19 March 2013

© 2013 Low and Johnston; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Introduction

This study aimed to implement a multidisciplinary quality improvement project in Perth Royal Infirmary A&E department to improve documentation of visual acuity (VA) in patients presenting with ocular injury.

Methods

The improvement project involves a three-pronged multidisciplinary approach: ensure that equipment required for VA testing (Snellen chart and pinhole mask) was readily available; encourage VA testing at first point of contact with A&E staff, both nursing/medical staff; and refresher online course on how to test for VA quickly and accurately, in the 6/X format. We compared the pre-intervention (2 September to 2 October 2012) and post-intervention (11 October to 19 November 2012) rates of VA documentation using the chi-square test.

Results

During the pre-intervention period, of a total of 44 patients who presented to A&E with eye injury, only 36 patients (95%) had their VA tested. Following intervention, there was significant improvement in VA testing, where all 43 patients presenting to A&E with eye injuries had their VA tested (100%, P = 0.02). Documentation of VA in the correct (6/X) format increased from 82 to 84% following intervention. There was a 15% improvement in documentation of best-corrected VA, from 48 to 63% post intervention. See Figure 1.

Conclusion

Through a multidisciplinary approach, we were successful in achieving our target of 100% VA documentation rate in all patients presenting with eye injury to PRI A&E.